Evaluation of supercritical cryogen storage and transfer systems for future NASA missions

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Published by National Aeronautics and Space Administration, For sale by the National Technical Information Service in [Washington, DC], [Springfield, Va .

Written in English

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  • Rockets (Aeronautics) -- Launching.

Edition Notes

Book details

StatementHugh Arif, John C. Aydelott and David J. Chato.
SeriesNASA technical memorandum -- 102394.
ContributionsAydelott, John C., Chato, David J., United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination1 v.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15277932M

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Evaluation of supercritical cryogen storage and transfer Evaluation of supercritical cryogen storage and transfer systems for future NASA missions book for future NASA missions. "The Development of Cryogenic Storage Systems for Space Flight," NASA SP, 2. Conceptual designs of Space Transportation Vehicles (STV), and their orbital servicing facilities, that utilize supercritical, single phase, cryogenic propellant were established and compared with conventional subcritical, two phases, STV concepts.

The analytical study was motivated by the desire to avoid fluid management problems associated with the storage, acquisition and transfer of Cited by: 3. Evaluation of supercritical cryogen storage and transfer systems for future NASA missions Conceptual designs of Space Transportation Vehicles (STV), and their orbital servicing facilities, that utilize supercritical, single phase, cryogenic propellants were established and compared with conventional subcritical, two phase, STV concepts.

Get this from a library. Evaluation of supercritical cryogen storage and transfer systems for future NASA missions. [Hugh Arif; John C Aydelott; David J Chato; United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration.]. Evaluation of supercritical cryogen storage and transfer systems for future NASA missions.

The analytical study was motivated by the desire to avoid fluid management problems associated with the storage, acquisition and transfer of subcritical liquid oxygen and hydrogen propellants in the low gravity environment of space.

Although feasible. Cryogenic propellants such as hydrogen, methane, and oxygen are required for many current and future space missions. Operating efficiency and reliability of these cryogenic systems must be improved considering the launch environment, operations in a space environment, and system.

- The Cryogenic Propellant Storage & Transfer mission will demonstrate technologies required for the development of in-space cryogenic systems to support exploration beyond low-Earth orbit. - The mission will support multiple human architecture elements.

Cryogenic on-orbit liquid depot storage acquisition and transfer (COLD-SAT) experiment subsystem instrumentation and wire harness design report Subcritical cryogens such as liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) are required for space based transportation propellant, reactant, and life support systems.

Future long-duration space missions will require on-orbit systems capable of long. The benefits of cryogenic transfer to exploration missions are examined. and Chato, D.J., “Evaluation of Supercritical Storage and Transfer Systems. for Future NASA Missions.

WASHINGTON — NASA wants to fly a mission in that will demonstrate core technologies needed for long-term storage and transfer of cryogenic rocket fuels in space — a capability the agency says. thermodynamics for cryogenic fluid management systems/subsystems for in-space cryogenic systems with propellants in a settled and an unsettled states.

The maturation of these capabilities will reduce the development cost and risk for future NASA exploration missions employing in-space cryogenic storage and transfer systems.

The benefits of cryogenic transfer to exploration missions are examined. The current state of the art of transfer technology is reviewed. Evaluation of supercritical storage and transfer systems for future NASA Missions. Journal of Propulsion and Power 8(2). NASA Cryogenic Technology Objectives • To develop storage and distribution technologies for cryogens that will support the enabling of high performance cryogenic propulsion systems, lunar/planetary surface systems, and economical ground operations.

– Such technologies can significantly reduce propellant launch mass and required. Topic Description: This subtopic solicits technologies related to cryogenic propellant (such as hydrogen, oxygen, and methane) storage, transfer, and instrumentation to support NASA's exploration goals.

This includes a wide range of applications, scales, and environments consistent with future NASA missions. This balanced suite of missions shows the need for low mass/volume energy storage that can effectively operate in extreme environments for future NASA Science Missions.

Future science missions will require advanced primary and secondary battery systems capable of operating at temperature extremes from ° C for outer planet missions to Technologies include 20 K cryocoolers for Mars missions, cryocooler integration techniques, heat exchangers, distributed cooling, and circulators.

Scavenging of residual propellants. Zero gravity cryogenic control devices including thermodynamic vent systems, spray bars and mixers, and liquid acquisition devices.

This topic solicits technologies related to cryogenic propellant storage, transfer, and instrumentation to support NASA's exploration goals. Proposed technologies should feature enhanced safety, reliability, long-term space use, economic efficiency over current state-of-the-art, or enabling technologies to allow NASA to meet future space exploration goals.

“Evaluation of Supercritical Cryogen Storage and Transfer Systems for Future NASA Missions,” Hugh Arif, John C.

Aydelott, and David 1. Chato, 28th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Reno, NV, JanuaryAIAA This subtopic solicits technologies related to cryogenic propellant storage, transfer, and instrumentation to support NASA's exploration goals.

Proposed technologies should feature enhanced safety, reliability, long-term space use, economic efficiency over current state-of-the-art, or enabling technologies to allow NASA to meet future space. Arif, Hugh et al. Evaluation of supercritical cryogen storage and transfer systems for future NASA missions.

AIAA28th AIAA aerospace sciences meeting, Reno, NV, January The Evolution of Cryogenic Storage Systems Toward Advanced Spacecraft Missions The application of cryogenic fluid storage systems to manned spacecraft is considered attractive primarily because of the substantial weight and volume saving afforded compared with high-pressure gaseous storage at ambient temperature.

Electronic components and systems capable of operation at cryogenic temperatures are anticipated in many future NASA space missions such as deep space probes and planetary surface exploration.

For example, an unheated interplanetary probe launched to explore the rings of Saturn would reach an average temperature near Saturn of about °C. Cryogenics Development, testing, and evaluation. Development, testing, and evaluation of thermal insulation systems and advanced cryogenic systems and components.

The Cryogenics and Fluids Branch at the Goddard Space Flight Center provides cooling for earth-orbiting payloads and does research on space cryogenics. Our work includes mechanical coolers, liquid cryogens, and magnetic coolers.

Our website includes a description of our work in nontechnical terms. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) focuses on research and development of electrical components and systems suitable for applications in deep space missions. Research is being conducted on devices and systems for use down to cryogenic temperature ( C).

The goal of the low temperature electronics program is to develop and demon. —Hyperion. Launched on NASA’s New Millennium EO-1 spacecraft in Novemberthe Hyperion instrument was a technology demonstrator to support evaluation of hyperspectral technology for future Earth observing missions.

It has a single telescope and two spectrometers. The Cryogenics Test lab is a unique provider of comprehensive cryogenic services for the aerospace industry and many other commercial industries. Capabilities / Services Development, testing, and evaluation of thermal insulation systems and advanced cryogenic systems.

Under the contract, Boeing will design, manufacture and test two lightweight composite cryogenic propellant tanks. The demonstration effort will use advanced composite materials to develop new technologies that could be applied to multiple future NASA missions, including human space exploration beyond low Earth orbit.

Performance requirements for the Earth departure stage, as well as the lunar lander descent and ascent stages, point toward the use of cryogenic engines and propellants for missions of up to days on the surface of the Moon. CFM team research is focused on the storage, fluid distribution, liquid acquisition, and mass gauging of cold propellants.

NASA's Space Launch System heavy-lift rocket. NASA's cryogenic storage tank research is part of and flying hardware for use in NASA's future missions. For more information about NASA's.

boiloff storage of cryogenic propellants in space flight systems. 17,18 At the Johnson Space Center, the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) project is designing a system that will use high-temperature superconducting coils for plasma containment and acceleration CRYOCOOLER DEVELOPMENT FOR FUTURE NASA MISSIONS.

An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video An illustration of an audio speaker. NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS) Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Technology Maturation: Establishing a Foundation for a Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM).

A redesign of the whole O 2 storage and utilization system followed. A third cryogenic oxygen tank was added into sector 1 of the Service Module, opposite sector 4 which contained the power generating equipment and the rest of the oxygen tanks.

NASA has awarded $ million in "Tipping Point" contracts designed to aid its push to get astronauts back to the moon and then on to Mars, agency officials announced today (Oct. 14). NASA has appropriately defined LSS capabilities and technologies to meet the objectives for planned missions to the ISS and the Moon, including a new space vehicle, rovers, EVA systems, and surface habitats.

For missions to the ISS and initial short-duration (approximately 7-day) missions to the Moon, the LSS for space vehicles, including. If feasible, these techniques could provide a practical base for lunar and other deep space missions.

Exhibit B to the purchase request was a Statement of Work for Atlas-Agena vehicles to be used in Project Gemini. Air Force Space Systems Division, acting as a NASA contractor, would procure the. The sort of efficiency savings the new composite propellant tanks could offer will enable future NASA missions to reach new destinations.

Part of NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate, the composite cryogenic storage tank project forms a critical path of the program designed to innovate, develop, manufacture, test and ultimately fly new.

Previously attempted, but never flown depot demonstration missions are discussed in Appendix A. Figure shows a typical cryogenic fuel depot concept which shows the LH 2 and LOX tanks, as well as a docked Centaur upper stage (Kutter, ).This particular depot is sized for a single mission; full-scale depots supporting routine commercial space travel would obviously be much larger.

This project was funded by NASA. R&D Processes for Increasing the Fluid Density of Cryogenic Liquids. Technologies that provide for the densification (sub-cooling) of cryogenic propellants, conditioning, transfer, storage and mass gauging are of prime interest for spaceports of the future.

Major aerospace and longtime NASA-contractor Lockheed Martin received $ million for an in-space demonstration mission that would test more than a dozen cryogenic fluid management systems.Thibault, J, Corre, C, Demeure, L, & Mer, S. "Thermodynamic Control Systems for Cryogenic Propellant Storage During Long Missions." Proceedings of the ASME 4th Joint US-European Fluids Engineering Division Summer Meeting collocated with the ASME 12th International Conference on Nanochannels, Microchannels, and Minichannels.CRAFT Tech software created this visual representation of the ground effects on the exhaust from an aircraft.

Specializing in fluid dynamics, combustion, and aero-acoustics modeling for aerospace and commercial applications, CRAFT Tech provides commercial tools, consulting support, system design and concept evaluation, and ground and flight test support.

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