Choral identity and the chorus of elders in Greek tragedy by U. S. Dhuga

Cover of: Choral identity and the chorus of elders in Greek tragedy | U. S. Dhuga

Published by Lexington Books in Lanham, Md .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Drama,
  • History and criticism,
  • Chorus (Greek drama),
  • Greek drama (Tragedy)

About the Edition

Debate concerning the extent to which the tragic chorus is marginal to the dramatic action has prevailed in discussions of choral identity and, more broadly, Greek tragedy as a whole, since the time of Aristotle. Furthermore, it is supposed that choruses not tied to the role of Athenian military-age men are all the more marginal. Yet choral identity challenges our understanding of the ancient Greek tragic chorus_and thus of Greek tragedy as a whole_because the dramatic identities of tragic choruses are, with few exceptions, so different from the identities of the plays" external audiences. Choral Identity and the Chorus of Elders in Greek Tragedy presents U.S. Dhuga"s radical reappraisal of the ancient Greek tragic chorus. Through a close reading of the speech, song, and choreography among choruses of old men, Dhuga overturns previous assumptions about the chorus of elders, arguing that their decrepitude and supposed low social rank resulted in the historically dismissive view of the chorus of elders. This book demonstrates that choruses of elders are instead remarkably central to the tragic action. Dhuga guides us through detailed yet readable analyses of the choruses in Sophocles" Oedipus Coloneus and Antigone, Euripides" Heraclidae and Hercules Furens, and Aeschylus" Agamemnon. Through these works, Dhuga broadens our understanding of the ongoing, if not increasing, importance that the chorus commands in Greek tragedy. Choral Identity and the Chorus of Elders in Greek Tragedy is a must-read for anyone who wants a more complete understanding of the power and complexity of Greek tragedy.

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

Book details

StatementU.S. Dhuga
SeriesGreek studies: interdisciplinary approaches, Greek studies
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPA3136 .D48 2011
The Physical Object
Paginationxii, 197 p. ;
Number of Pages197
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25106888M
ISBN 100739147307
ISBN 109780739147306
LC Control Number2010032214
OCLC/WorldCa650219851

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Choral Identity and the Chorus of Elders in Greek Tragedy presents U.S. Dhuga's radical reappraisal of the ancient Greek tragic chorus. Through a close reading of the speech, song, and choreography among choruses of old men, Dhuga overturns previous assumptions about the chorus of elders, arguing that their decrepitude and supposed low social Cited by: 3.

Choral Identity and the Chorus of Choral identity and the chorus of elders in Greek tragedy book in Greek Tragedy presents U.S. Dhuga's radical reappraisal of the ancient Greek tragic chorus.

Through a close reading of the speech, song, and choreography among choruses of old men, Dhuga overturns previous assumptions about the chorus of elders, arguing that their decrepitude and supposed low social Brand: U S Dhuga.

Choral Identity and the Chorus of Elders in Greek Tragedy presents U.S. Dhuga\'s radical reappraisal of the ancient Greek tragic chorus.

Through a close reading of the speech, song, and choreography among choruses of old men, Dhuga overturns previous assumptions about the chorus of elders, arguing that their decrepitude and supposed low social. Browse more videos.

Playing next. Choral Identity and the Chorus of Elders in Greek Tragedy challenges the commonly held view that choruses are marginalized by the roles they play in classical Athenian tragedy.

Focusing on those Sign in| Create an accountISBN(s): Investigates choral identity in Greek tragedy. BMCR Choral Identity and the Chorus of Elders in Greek tragedy. Greek Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches. Drawing on earlier analyses of the social context of Greek drama, the non-textual dimensions of tragedy, and the relations between dramatic and melic choruses, the chapters explore the uses of various analytic tools in allowing us better to capture the specificity of the tragic chorus.

In Greek tragedy, the Chorus consisted of a group of approximately ten people, playing the role of death messenger, dancing, singing, and commenting throughout from the margins of the action. Anouilh reduces the Chorus to a single figure who retains his collective function nevertheless.

On the meaning of praxis and muthos in Aristotle’s Poetics as applied to Tragedy see J. Jones, On Aristotle and Greek Tragedy, Chattos & Windus, London,This is certainly not a view that I would share. Although there may have been a reduction in the chorus’ role which accompanied the rise of the actor, the chorus remained a.

To retain the atmosphere of ritual in the dramatic event – a chorus was present at all Greek ceremonial and religious occasions. To set a lyrical mood or tone to the drama, reinforcing the acting with vocal performance and choreography (the rhythms of the choral work were often as important as the content).

Reading Online Greek Picture Book: Lilly s Surprise: Greek books for en s English-Greek. surtecakna. Full E-book Choral Identity and the Chorus of Elders in Greek Tragedy (Greek Studies: tomixe. Trending. Matthew McConaughey. This book argues that the voice is a crucial element of mortal identity in the tragedies of Aeschylus.

It first presents conceptions of the voice in ancient Greek poetry and philosophy, understanding it in its most literal and physical form, as well as through the many metaphorical connotations that spring from it.

Download Book Now ?book= My first book, Choral Identity and the Chorus of Elders in Greek Tragedy, combines current perspectives on gerontology and social marginalisation, as against Archaic Greek (mostly Homeric) and Title: Professor of Classical Philology |. General overview of theories on the chorus.

Includes a concise discussion of formal characteristics of choral sections and genre interaction in Greek tragedy. Dhuga, Umit Singh.

Choral identity and the chorus of elders in Greek tragedy. Choral Identity and the Chorus of Elders in Greek Tragedy (Greek Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches) by U. Dhuga () Jan 1, Hardcover $ $   Structure.

The divisions of ancient plays were marked by interludes of choral odes. For this reason, the first song of the chorus is called the parodos (or eisodos because the chorus enters at this time), although the subsequent ones are called stasima, standing songs. The episodes, like acts, follow the parados and exodus is the final, leaving-the-stage choral ode.

A series of essays on Euripides begins with Laura Swift on the “fluidity of choral identity” () in tragedy. Swift argues that Euripides used his choruses to contemplate group membership, inasmuch as the chorus can act “as representatives of its own Greek community” ().

Dhuga, a Calvin professor of classical languages, has recently published a new book, Choral Identity and the Chorus of Elders in Greek Tragedy (Lexington Books) in which he rehabilitates the reputation of one particular species of Greek chorister: old men.

an archetypal chorus of elders is, to my mind, not unrelated to the reductive approach of many theories concerning choral identity.

Detailed discussion of the history of theories regarding Greek tragic choral identity, which range from, for example, Aristotle's Poetics. A Greek chorus, or simply chorus (Greek: χορός, translit. chorós), in the context of Ancient Greek tragedy, comedy, satyr plays, and modern works inspired by them, is a homogeneous, non-individualised group of performers, who comment with a collective voice on the dramatic action.

The chorus consisted of between 12 and 50 players, who variously danced, sang or spoke their lines in unison. CHORAL IDENTITY IN GREEK TRAGEDY helene foley G eorge Walsh, in whose honor I presented this lecture in Februaryhas written memorably on the Greek chorus, above all in his book The Varieties of Enchantment.

Walsh’s eloquent discus-sion of worldly and enchanting choral poetry in Euripides is a hard act to. The chorus of the elderly in classical Greek drama is a common trope in the theater of that period. Out of the thirty or so plays that are extant from the classical period, seven have choruses that consist of elderly people.

Choruses in ancient drama often provided some moralizing lesson to the protagonist, especially in tragedy. Choral Identity in Greek Tragedy.

Helene Foley; Helene Foley. Barnard College, Columbia University. Livia Sacchetti Arthur Miller and American Tragedy, (Feb ): Sheila Murnaghan The Euripidean Chorus, (Dec ).

In the works of Nietzsche the chorus takes on a completely new and profound philosophical meaning. In his The Birth of Tragedy Nietzsche presents a view of a distinct dissonance between what he calls the Apollonian and the Dionysian paradigms, referencing to the dramatic and choral qualities of Greek drama a metaphysical framework the chorus is the essence.

Henrichs, A. “Why Should I Dance. Choral Self-Referentiality in Greek Tragedy.” Arion 3: 56– Henrichs, A. “Dancing in Athens, Dancing on Delos: Some Patterns of Choral Projection in Euripides.” Philologus 48– Herington, J. Poetry into Drama: Early Tragedy and the Greek Poetic Tradition.

Dancing letters: the alphabetic Tragedy of Kallias / Renaud Gagné ; Choral dialectics: Hölderlin and Hegel / Joshua Billings ; Enter and exit the chorus: dance in Britain ; / Fiona Macintosh "The thorniest problem and the greatest opportunity": directors on directing the Greek chorus / Peter Meineck.

Of his first book—a Harvard Center for Hellenic Studies monograph entitled Choral Identity and the Chorus of Elders in Greek Tragedy ()—the literary critic Nicholas Birns has written: “Umit Singh Dhuga’s work on form and musicality in the choral element of Greek drama, little noticed by literary scholars in other fields, could one.

In Ancient Greek Theatre, there is an interesting similarity among the plays written during that time: there is always a chorus included.

Nowadays most people would associate a chorus with musicals, but playwrights like Aeschylus, Euripides, and Sophocles included a chorus. The chorus in Classical Greek drama was a group of actors who described and commented upon the main action of a play with song, dance, and recitation.

Greek tragedy had its beginnings in choral performances, in which a group of 50 men danced and sang dithyrambs —lyric hymns in. first ode or choral song in a Greek tragedy, chanted by the chorus as it enters the area in front of the stage Parados in Antigone The chorus recounts the battle between 2 brothers, Polyneices and Eteocles, and their armies; the chorus suggests that Zeus intervened on.

Choral training was the responsibility of a chorêgos, selected by an archon, one of the top officials in duty to train the chorus was like a tax on the wealthy citizens, and being members of a chorus (choreutai) was also part of Greek civic chorêgos provided all the equipment, costumes, props, and trainers for the roughly dozen choreutai.

choral competition. Despite the amount of preparation required, a Greek play was typically only produced once. In a Greek tragedy, the suffering of the protagonist is typically the result of some tragic mistake or fatal flaw, which is also called _____.

In the Chorus, the Theban elders seem to beg for help from _____. the gods in. Reading Greek Tragedy Online was created during the first weeks of the COVID lockdown.

The project's intention is to create community during a time of enforced separation, to foster dialogues between actors and academics, and to create an educational resource for a wide range of students.

“The Chorus,” a special edition of Reading Greek Tragedy Online focusing on choral passages and performance.

Featured performers include Hannah Barrie, Bettina Joy de Guzman, Tim Delap, T. Lynn Mikeska, Evelyn Miller, Paul O’Mahony, and Sara Valentine. A typical Greek comedic chorus has 24 members. Often the prologue reveals the identity of the chorus before it enters.

After the prologue, the chorus enters from the wings, sometimes rushing on as if going into battle, sometimes dancing its way into the orchestra.

choral dance, 9–10, 20, –12,–60 choral projection and, Greek chorus and contemporary dancing, –1, –7 Greek dance in early twentieth-century Britain, deixis absence of deixis in choral ode, 6 demonstrative pronoun, 44, 65, 97,melic poetry, 24 merging fiction and reality, 43, 75 referential ambiguity.

Choral Identity and the Chorus of Elders in Greek Tragedy. The Dramatic Chorus Maarit Kaimio: The Chorus of Greek Drama Within the Light of the Person and Number Used. (Commentationes Humanarum Litterarum, ) The Tragic Chorus (G.) Ley The Theatricality of Greek Tragedy.

Playing Space and Chorus. Xx +Ills. Chicago and. FEATURES:Crossing the Ancient Stage Female Choruses in Greek Tragedy Mary deForest University of Colorado E-mail: [email protected] In the orchestra, between the seats and the stage, the chorus of Greek drama is ideally placed to mediate between poet and audience (1).The music, song and dance, the lofty language and the Doric dialect, all carry the words outside the range of normal discourse.

This chapter examines the relationship of the chorus in tragedy to ritual choreia. It argues that ritual modes of approaching the gods can be divided into two types: euphemic and aischrologic. The former, addressed to the gods in prayer or praise, is highly constrained, avoiding reference to anything which might offend the deity and infect the purity of the address; the latter is characterised.

| By Gregory Nagy I challenge myself here to write up seven elementary “plot outlines”—I call them overviews—for seven Greek tragedies: (1) Agamemnon and (2) Libation-Bearers and (3) Eumenides, by Aeschylus; (4) Oedipus at Colonus and (5) Oedipus Tyrannus, by Sophocles; (6) Hippolytus and (7) Bacchae (or Bacchic Women), by Euripides.

In my overviews, I expect of the .Greek Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches Building on the foundations of scholarship within the disciplines of philology, philosophy, history, and archaeology, this series spans the continuum of Greek traditions extending from the second millennium, B.C.

to the .

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